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Facebook refused to take down fake account, says TikTok star
A young social media star with cerebral palsy says Facebook refused to take action after scammers used her content to set up a fake account and make money from her fans.Grace Wolstenholme, 20, who has 1.3m followers on TikTok, says she has lost income from not posting videos after she was advised by the police to stop. Content she put on TikTok and on Instagram was being stolen and posted on Facebook by someone pretending to be her.The fake Facebook account registered as a creator, which means it is eligible for fans to send stars and gifts that can be turned into money
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Trying to tame AI: Seoul summit flags hurdles to regulation

The Bletchley Park artificial intelligence summit in 2023 was a landmark event in AI regulation simply by virtue of its existence.Between the event’s announcement and its first day, the mainstream conversation had changed from a tone of light bafflement to a general agreement that AI regulation may be worth discussing.However, the task for its follow-up, held at a research park on the outskirts of Seoul this week, is harder: can the UK and South Korea show that governments are moving from talking about AI regulation to actually delivering it?At the end of the Seoul summit, the big achievement the UK was touting was the creation of a global network of AI safety institutes, building on the British trailblazers founded after the last meeting.The technology secretary, Michelle Donelan, attributed the new institutes to the “Bletchley effect” in action, and announced plans to lead a system whereby regulators in the US, Canada, Britain, France, Japan, Korea, Australia, Singapore and the EU share information about AI models, harms and safety incidents.“Two years ago, governments were being briefed about AI almost entirely by the private sector and academics, but they had no capacity themselves to really develop their own base of evidence,” said Jack Clark, the co-founder and head of policy at the AI lab Anthropic

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Elon Musk’s xAI raises $6bn in bid to take on OpenAI

Elon Musk’s artificial intelligence company xAI has closed a $6bn (£4.7bn) investment round that will make it among the best-funded challengers to OpenAI.The startup is only a year old, but it has rapidly built its own large language model (LLM), the technology underpinning many of the recent advances in generative artificial intelligence capable of creating human-like text, pictures, video, and voices.The funding round, one of the biggest yet in the burgeoning AI field, values the company at $18bn before taking into account the $6bn investment, Musk said on X, the social network he owns.Generative AI has so far proven very expensive to develop, in part because of the need for huge amounts of computing power and energy to train LLMs

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Scarlett Johansson’s OpenAI clash is just the start of legal wrangles over artificial intelligence

When OpenAI’s new voice assistant said it was “doing fantastic” in a launch demo this month, Scarlett Johansson was not.The Hollywood star said she was “shocked, angered and in disbelief” that the updated version of ChatGPT, which can listen to spoken prompts and respond verbally, had a voice “eerily similar” to hers.One of Johansson’s signature roles was as the voice of a futuristic version of Siri in the 2013 film Her and, for the actor, the similarity was stark. The OpenAI chief executive, Sam Altman, appeared to acknowledge the film’s influence with a one-word post on X on the day of the launch: “her”.In a statement, Johansson said Altman had approached her last year to be a voice of ChatGPT and that she had declined for “personal reasons”

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Could AI help cure ‘downward spiral’ of human loneliness?

Hollywood may have warned about the perils of striking up relationships with artificial intelligence, but one computer scientist says we may be missing a trick if we do not embrace the positives that human-machine relationships have to offer.Despite the travails of Joaquin Phoenix’s introverted and soon-to-be-divorced protagonist in the 2013 movie Her, one professor says we should be open to the comforts that chatbots can provide.Tony Prescott, professor of cognitive robotics at the University of Sheffield, argues that AI has an important role to play in preventing human loneliness. Just as we develop meaningful bonds with pets, and have no qualms about children playing with dolls, so should we be open to the value of AI to adults, he says.“In an age when many people describe their lives as lonely, there may be value in having AI companionship as a form of reciprocal social interaction that is stimulating and personalised,” Prescott writes in a new book, The Psychology of Artificial Intelligence

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Big tech has distracted world from existential risk of AI, says top scientist

Big tech has succeeded in distracting the world from the existential risk to humanity that artificial intelligence still poses, a leading scientist and AI campaigner has warned.Speaking with the Guardian at the AI Summit in Seoul, South Korea, Max Tegmark said the shift in focus from the extinction of life to a broader conception of safety of artificial intelligence risked an unacceptable delay in imposing strict regulation on the creators of the most powerful programs.“In 1942, Enrico Fermi built the first ever reactor with a self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction under a Chicago football field,” Tegmark, who trained as a physicist, said. “When the top physicists at the time found out about that, they really freaked out, because they realised that the single biggest hurdle remaining to building a nuclear bomb had just been overcome. They realised that it was just a few years away – and in fact, it was three years, with the Trinity test in 1945