NEWS NOT FOUND

societySee all
A picture

There are too many children in care who could be looked after by their families | Letters

Your editorial, quoting Sir James Munby’s denunciations of the lack of proper provision of care services for young people, was interesting (The Guardian view on care failures: vulnerable children need homes, not court orders, 13 June). But failures in specialist care provision don’t just affect those young people subjected to deprivation of liberty orders and sent to poorly regulated private residential care, isolated from families and friends.Children’s services are largely unregulated, confidentiality is highly regarded, and scrutiny avoided. A recent report by Health Equity North, published on behalf of the child of the north all-party parliamentary group, highlighted regional variations in the number of children taken into care in England. One in every 88 children in the north-east – where I live – is in care, compared with one in 140 across England, and children in care homes generally require high levels of support from public agencies

June182024
A picture

Why critics worry counselling app BetterHelp could create codependency

After her mother’s death, Elizabeth* sought therapy to process the trauma of seeing her father abuse her mother while she was suffering from dementia.With a lack of therapists on the New South Wales South Coast, she turned to online counselling platform BetterHelp, which claims to “remove the traditional barriers to therapy”.BetterHelp’s website says it provides “affordable and accessible” care, and charges clients $90 to $120 a week to talk with a therapist “however you feel comfortable – text, chat, phone, or video … when you need it”.After matching with a therapist on 20 February, Elizabeth was immediately charged a monthly fee of $296.64, discounting her first week of therapy

June182024
A picture

AI-enhanced blood test may detect Parkinson’s years before onset

A blood test that draws on artificial intelligence can predict who will develop Parkinson’s disease up to seven years before symptoms arise, researchers say.The test is designed to work on equipment already found in many NHS laboratories and, if validated in a broad population of people, could be made available to the health service within two years.There are no drugs to protect the brain from Parkinson’s at present, but an accurate predictive test would enable clinics to identify people who stand to benefit most from clinical trials of treatments that aim to slow or halt the disease.“At the moment, we’re shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted,” said Prof Kevin Mills, a senior author on the study at UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health. “We need to get to people before they develop symptoms

June182024
A picture

‘My state pension was £880 – and my rent was £1,000’: how a 70-year-old man became homeless in Britain

Tony Sinclair had worked all his life – but still found himself sleeping rough. Then even his tent was taken away from himIn a way, 70-year-old Tony Sinclair was lucky to be in his tent on the day last year when the police arrived. The canvas that kept him from the elements ended up in the bin, but, unlike several of his neighbours, he was able to save his most important possessions from going the same way.On 10 November, he was in Huntley Street in central London, in one of 10 tents pitched in a row next to University College hospital. Officers turned up “demanding my details, name, date of birth

June182024
A picture

Victoria to raise age of criminal responsibility to 12 with no exceptions

Victoria is set to become the first state in Australia to raise the age of criminal responsibility to 12, although police will be given new powers to use “limited force” to compel 10- and 11-year-olds to accompany them to a police station.The changes will form part of the government’s long-awaited youth justice bill, which will be introduced to parliament on Tuesday. The bill also includes measures that the premier, Jacinta Allan, said would crack down on “serious, high-risk and repeat” youth offending.“This is legislation that will reduce youth offending, it will increase safety, but .

June182024
A picture

Doctors call for English drink-drive limit to be cut to equivalent of a small drink

Doctors have called for England’s drink-driving limit to be reduced to the equivalent of a small glass of wine or beer, in a proposal supported by a number of medical and road safety organisations.England’s legal limit for getting safely behind the wheel is one of the highest in Europe at 80mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood, a law established in 1967.The British Medical Association (BMA) said it would lobby the next government to reduce the limit by nearly half for most people, to 50mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood, or 0.05%, and to 20mg for new and commercial drivers.Alcohol and drug-related deaths were at a record high in 2021 and 2022, the BMA said in a statement on Monday

June172024